Environment artist and indie developer Lorenzo Drago shared an astonishing clip showing a photorealistic railway station in Japan that has actually been created with Unreal Engine 5 and Camera Matching. It offers us a glimpse of what photorealistic virtual reality might actually look like.

The clip is footage shot by the artist and is from a scene based on the Etchū-Daimon Station, a train station found in Toyama, Japan. The clip is so realistic it looks like it was captured with a smartphone.

The assets shown in the clip have super high resolution and this, coupled with the shimmering lighting adds a degree of realism that makes it almost impossible to distinguish the real from the scene even though this is only a pre-rendered scene.

The demo is powered by Unreal Engine 5’s lighting tech which brings out the astonishingly realistic scene and also oozes out some of the horror elements. Drago posted on his art station page that the clip has been shot with “real-time VR tracking” in such a way as to “emulate a handheld camera and flashlight.”

It doesn’t necessarily imply that the experience ran fully in virtual reality with all the processing requirements needed for this. The developer might as well have been using a Vive Tracker or something similar in recording the clip.

Unreal Engine 5 does not support virtual reality headsets. However, at the moment, it does not have some of the features such as Lumen and Nanite and was recently released for a test run by studios. Judging by the clip, Unreal Engine 5 will result in some of the most realistic games ever. However, it will take a few years for the big-budget, AAA-flatscreen games to start arriving in the market. It might take even longer for the VR titles to start dropping.

Virtual worlds won’t be looking this hyper-real for quite some time. Running apps made in Unreal Engine 5 are quite performance-intensive when run at their highest settings, even for flatscreen games. VR games will impose even higher performance demands. Besides, making games with this level of fidelity requires even bigger budgets. However, this clip offers a promising glimpse of the quality that we can look forward to in PC VR games a few years from now.

http://virtualrealitytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/Unreal-Engine-5.pnghttp://virtualrealitytimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/Unreal-Engine-5-150x90.pngSam OchanjiComputingTechnologyEnvironment artist and indie developer Lorenzo Drago shared an astonishing clip showing a photorealistic railway station in Japan that has actually been created with Unreal Engine 5 and Camera Matching. It offers us a glimpse of what photorealistic virtual reality might actually look like. The clip is footage shot by...VR, Oculus Rift, and HTC Vive News - Cryptocurrency, Adult, Sex, Porn, XXX